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Books be e-axes - Apr 2012

"Why Capitalism?" by Allan H. Meltzer
Fri, 2012-04-06 16:22   -   (0) comments
Capitalism is not the only possible way of organising the world, and Meltzer weighs up the alternatives. He also explains the current debate on the benefits and supposed shortcomings of capitalism.

"Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets" by Debra Satz
Fri, 2012-04-06 16:38   -   (0) comments

"..Markets,Satz demonstrates, are far too important to be left to economists. In this masterful work, the culmination of many years of thought, Satz provides a highly original framework to assist our reflections on which markets are beneficial and which, as she puts, it are 'noxious'." Jonathan Wolff, University College London

 


"The Limits of Europeanization: Reform Capacity and Policy Conflict in Greece" by Kevin Featherstone and Dimitris Papadimitriou
Tue, 2012-04-10 15:10   -   (0) comments
This book, although publsihed in 2008 and based on statistics up to 2006, presents an excellent analysis of Greece's inability to implement the Lisbon Programme. The authors succesfully identify the domestic constraints on reform with particular emphasis on the structural problems of the labor market and the pension system. "The limits of Europeanization" should be a reference text for all economists interested in the Greek crisis.

"China's Remarkable Economic Growth" by John Knight and Sai Ding
Thu, 2012-04-12 15:48   -   (0) comments
The book examines the causal processes at work in the evolution of China's institutions and policies.A common thread that runs throughout the book is the underlying political economy: why China became a 'developmental state', and how it has maintained itself as a 'developmental state'.

'Economics After the Crisis: Objectives and Means" by Adair Turner
Thu, 2012-04-12 16:08   -   (0) comments

“A well-researched and profound rethink of macroeconomic and financial policy after the crisis. Lord Adair Turner not only challenges the consensus on short-term tactical approaches to regulation and macroeconomic management, but he forces the reader to think more deeply about the long term goals of policy, including unfettered growth and the role of the free market,” Kenneth Rogoff.


"Finance and the Good Society" by Robert J. Shiller
Fri, 2012-04-13 16:49   -   (0) comments

"[F]inance and the Good Society is so contrarian as to be shocking--all the more so because its author, Robert Shiller, is no head-in-the-sand capitalist nor a highly paid Wall Street shill. . . ." --Economist


"End This Depression Now!" by Paul Krugman
Tue, 2012-04-17 12:49   -   (0) comments
How bad have things gotten? How did we get stuck in what now can only be called a depression? And above all, how do we free ourselves?

"The Clash of Generations: Saving Ourselves, Our Kids, and Our Economy" by Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Scott Burns
Tue, 2012-04-17 13:12   -   (0) comments

"....This is a great book of great importance, and every paragraph contains some new and interesting observation.”
George Akerlof, Nobel Laureate in Economics, 2001


"The Clash of Economic Ideas: A Review" by Lawrence White
Fri, 2012-04-27 16:12   -   (0) comments

"The Clash of Economic Ideas is one of those rare books that makes the history of economic thought an intellectual adventure while remaining highly relevant to the issues and controversies of the present day..."  -- Mario J. Rizzo, New York University


"Foundations for New Economic Thinking: A Collection of Essays" by Sheila C. Dow
Mon, 2012-04-30 12:28   -   (0) comments

"...The range of topics covered is impressive, from the non-neutrality of formalism, to how best to handle open systems, pervasive uncertainty, animal spirits, and other problems that economists must face...' - Bruce Caldwell, Duke University, USA



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