Democracy, Redistribution, and Political Participation: Evidence from Sweden 1919-1938 | E-Axes
 

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Democracy, Redistribution, and Political Participation: Evidence from Sweden 1919-1938

Abstract

In this paper, we compare how two different types of political regimes-direct versus representative democracy-redistribute income towards the relatively poor segments of society after the introduction of universal and equal suffrage. Swedish local governments are used as a testing ground since this setting offers a number of attractive features for a credible impact evaluation. Most importantly, we exploit the existence of a population threshold, which partly determined a local government's choice of democracy to implement a regression-discontinuity design. The results indicate that a representative democracy spends 40-60 percent more on public welfare. Our interpretation is that direct democracy may be more prone to elite capture than representative democracy since the elite's potential to exercise de facto power is likely to be greater in direct democracy after democratization.

To download the PDF verions of the working paper click here.


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